Camgirls: Tips For Moving Into A New House (Buying or Renting)

For Rent

Camgirl Moving Guide by Aerie Saunders

Here are some tips and hints for camgirls who are moving, by camgirl and clip producer, Aerie Saunders.

 

Step 1: Securing A Place!

Depending on your age, location, property needs, etc. you will either be choosing to rent or own your next home! The requirements for these are a bit different.

 

Buying A New House

Applying For A Mortgage: Have you already applied for your loan? If you haven’t yet, you may want to put that on hold and do a “review” of your financial records to ensure you won’t have any issues receiving a loan because of your status as a contractor. Some common issues that may be overlooked can arise and cause problems with your loan eligibility or possibly lower the amount you could get approved for.

For example, if on paper you made 50k but had 10k in write-offs (we all love write-offs, less tax burden, yay!) for home loan purposes, you made only 40k. This can substantially effect your loan eligibility. Buying a house will probably require quite a bit of advance planning, and changing the way you look at your taxes. Instead of trying to decrease your tax burdens through write-offs and non-taxable income you may find it will benefit you more when you are looking to buy a house to increase your tax burdens.

Home Shopping: Once you evaluate your financial standings and have decided you are planning to purchase a home, you will want to be sure you have a sizable down payment, especially if you have not been camming for 3+ years. This is because “self employment” income (1099-misc) is usually less trustworthy in the eyes of the banks you would be getting your mortgage through. Unless you can prove a sense of consistency through your tax records, they will be relying a lot on the amount of your down payment.

Unclaimed Income: This also becomes tricky for models because, let’s face it, we don’t claim EVERY SINGLE THING we make. A lot of us don’t claim: Amazon gift cards, various other gift cards, earnings from sites we made less than $400 on, payments for custom videos through sites which don’t report income, payments for our phone numbers/contact information, etc. Since some of these things aren’t claimed, it is hard for the bank to understand that the earnings laid out in your taxes aren’t what you are using for “spending money” as well as money for bills/payments.

Making sure your down payment is large will help show the bank you are able to save money and will give them more assurance that you’re likely to pay your loan.

 

Renting A New House

If you are planning to rent a home you will want to be sure you have “verifiable income.” This stresses a lot of people out because being self employed usually means we have income coming in from all over the place. If you report all your income on your taxes, then using your tax return paperwork and 1099’s will be the best way to prove your “verifiable income.”

Bank Statements As Proof of Income: If you don’t report all of your income on your taxes, get fan assistance with bills that you don’t report, or have some circumstance in which you don’t want to show them your 1099’s/tax documents (maybe because it states where the payment is coming from and sex worker discrimination is totally a thing) you can use bank statements! I am a renter and this is my personal method. Bank statements are also great for me because they can see the amount I make, the amount I spend, and the amount I put into savings on average. My bank statements prove that I am a good renter, they can see I pay my rent early/on time, and that I also pay many other bills regularly.

When providing bank statements, I always opt to provide the most recent three months of statements, and one from a year prior. It shows consistency! If you fear your potential landlord will discriminate against you due to your job, you can tell them many alternative job positions that aren’t really lies: social media marketing management, model, graphic designer, online client sourcing, marketing and affiliate blogging… you get the idea! You can pick something that fits you!

 

Step 2: Assessing Your Needs!

What you will need in a home will vary depending on what services you offer. If you have family/roommates, etc. If you’re living alone or with a partner you share a room with, you may want to opt for a two bedroom. You will be able to write off part of your rent on your taxes since your 2nd bedroom will be your “home office.” You will want to cam mostly if not solely from this room so it can’t be argued that you use it for personal gain.

Depending on your budget, you can also go bigger and get a 3 bedroom and have your camming room, and filming room or office. Your office would be where you do your social media managing, handle emails, update things, etc. This room would then also be able to get a tax write off.

Keep in mind that the tax write off will not cover the cost of having the extra room in most cases, this is purely based on convenience of having more space and being able to separate your work life from your home life which becomes a difficult task as someone who works from home.

 

Living With Family Or Roommates Is Trickier

If you live with family or a roommate, finding a home to suit your needs may be trickier. Homes with “mother-in-law suites” tend to be the best for situations like these. Although depending on your location that may be harder to find. You can also split floors to keep some privacy. This is especially important if you are going to be living with children who can not be around your work. If you are living with any minors, make sure you make your boundaries clear and have a door with a lock! Sites take minors appearing on cam very seriously, even if by mistake!

 

Step 3: Understanding Your Budget!

As a cam girl, our income is more high risk and unstable than people who work hourly or salary jobs. When deciding on a new home, it is advised by many companies that you make at least 3x the rent amount. So if you are getting a home that is $1,000 a month, you will want to be making $3,000 a month.

Don’t Over Budget: The biggest problem within the cam community is “buying at our highs” meaning when we submit rental verification etc. we “flex” with our income from good months. If you get $1,000 home in July, and made $1,500 in April and May but made $3,000 in June, then that home is too much for you. Good months are amazing and so fulfilling but they are not what you should base your income off of. Look through your past year of bank statements and find your lowest earning month, and your second lowest earning month.

Assessing Earnings Data: Assess why those were low earning months (could you have made more if you worked more, but chose not to?) If your low earnings are due to personal lack of effort, consider if that is something that could happen again. If your low earnings can’t be traced back to a specific reason that you can fix or change, then these are the months you should base your income off of.

The great thing about staying within your means is that once you have another good month you will have so much extra money you won’t know what to do with it (and my suggestion is throw that into savings, because you never really know what’ll happen!)